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Should Metcons be Done Daily?

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Should Metcons be Done Daily?

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Should Metcons be Done Daily?

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The majority of the CrossFit gym programming we see looks like this on a daily basis:

  1. Warm-up
  2. Strength
  3. Metcon

First, let’s go over the CONS of the typical CrossFit (strength + metcon programming):

  • Interruption effect - disruption of adaptation of energy systems when strength is done too closely to an intense bout of exercise.
  • Lack of emphasis on movement quality - not enough time spent on practice because the class needs to move quickly through the workout.
  • Overlapping body parts too often (not enough time to recover)
  • The mental aspect - when people have to think about going all-out every day, that’s their emphasis (not on movement quality)
  • Priority of the metcon - often, people are concerned more about the metcon of the day than the strength portion and their strength work gets less emphasis than going for time.
  • Workouts are not typically properly progressed in training phases/blocks.

Many gyms and individuals program as if they are performing the sport, throwing down on the daily. Liken this to an MMA athlete...they don't spar every day. Or a football player...every day isn't game day. 

There’s a better way to incorporate CrossFit into your routine. And that means swapping out the daily metcon for high-quality strength work on some days; aerobic work on others. 

CrossFit CAN fit into a well-rounded program. Here’s how:

  • Metcons done as a test 1-2 times per week and not every day.
  • The rest of the time is spent getting stronger and increasing the quality of the movements.
  • Nix the novelty workouts and Hero workout weeks, etc.
  • Movements should usually be done as practice most of the time and not under the stress of the clock. 

Here’s a sample template of quality strength and conditioning with CrossFit as a test:

Monday: strength circuits/hypertrophy work

Tuesday: aerobic work (intervals, endurance, etc.)

Wednesday: strength circuits

Thursday: aerobic work or rest

Friday: strength circuits/hypertrophy work and gymnastics practice

Saturday: “test” aka the metcon

Sunday: rest or active recovery 

Be kind to your body and central nervous system while gaining strength and capacity and improving movement…that should be the goal of any well-rounded program for health and longevity.

By Wendy Shafranski

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